When a brief requires you to post two images, two creative concepts are better than one. The best way to make brands love your content and want to give you repeat work is to create distinctly different imagery. Variety is the spice of life after all.

There’s a reason why brands are asking for more than one piece of content from you over going to someone else. Because they love what you create. This means that you have an opportunity to show off the scope of your photographic skills.

If two images are required, creating two contrasting images will also double your chances of having a piece of content selected for additional usage rights and receiving more payment. The most successful influencers are savvy about this and plan for two images accordingly in their shoots.

If you want to create 2 flatlays, for example, make sure there is a clear point of difference between the two – they should each tell a slightly different story. You could use a different backdrop, props or lighting. You could include a human interaction in one, but not the other. Get creative! Spacing out the two sponsored posts with some organic content on your feed is also a good idea

Sometimes the brand requests two different looks (e.g. beauty campaigns when a product shot and and in-use shot are often required) so be sure to follow this if directed to do so. Vamp briefs give our influencers full creative control so we always minimise creative direction wherever possible. It’s simply smart business as a content creator to create variety – both for your audience and for the brand.

It might be tempting to make your second shot an out-take from the photoshoot of your first shot. You might have struggled to choose your favourite image and all those images don’t get to see the light of day otherwise. You can always create a blog post alongside it with the other shots from the photoshoot. Brands are always so impressed by this! Plus, your audience will engage better with fresh looking content over something very similar to what they liked/commented on a few days before.

Connie Chan from @whatshepictures writes that photographers should push themselves further to develop their personal photographic style. “If you like shooting specific items, try expanding on that subject. For example: if you love shooting coffee, try expanding that into cafe culture. Shoot other foods that go well with coffee, interiors of cafes, baristas making coffee, or other aspects of cafe life. Most importantly, keep shooting beyond just your initial first ideas. Challenge yourself to see how else you can explore your subject through different angles and compositions. And then shoot more.” (Read the full article here)


Vamp Influencer @glassfauna created two images for our recent campaign with Intel. She did a stellar job of presenting two different creative concepts to her followers. She shared her thought processes behind the two different images and you can really see how much consideration went into both shots.

My primary focus was on showcasing different perspectives of the laptop so that viewers really get an idea of the aesthetic and dimensions. One of its strongest features are its sleek and minimalist feel. The flatlay gives a 3 dimensional sense of its polished compactness, whereas the lifestyle shot is less static – it shows the bends and movement as well as the streamlined design. It is also meant to reenact how it can seamlessly fit into a contemporary environment.


That’s the thing about the flatlay sometimes. They’re great for styling a product and showcasing its scale, textures and fine features… but they can just seem to static and too perfectly put together that they lack realism. That’s why I always try to mix it up!

Flatlays require suspension of disbelief. People don’t have the polished concrete background, the props, perfectly arranged flowers or whatever. But people do use their laptops on their lounges in the comfort of their homes. So I feel like lifestyle shots are more relatable to a wider demographic.

Natalie Popow

Digital Content Editor | Natalie is a tea-loving Brit that moved to Oz in search of adventure and inspiration. She arrived early to the Vamp party and loves coming into work everyday. Content Creation, in her view, opens up game-changing opportunities for diverse creatives from all different backgrounds to shape a media that better represents the world. Her loves include: new book smell, old book smell and spoken word poetry.

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